Archive for the ‘Worship Set Lists’ Category

This weekend we continued in the fifth week of our series, “Obedience,” and Joe shared about the life of Elijah and how he stood with the Lord to confront evil in his lifetime. You can listen to or watch the entire message and service here.

Here’s our service plan:

Pre-Service – “Suffering Servant” (A – B) [Dustin Kensrue]
“Sing to the King” (D) [Billy Foote, Charles Silvester Horne]
Greeting Time
Child Dedications (at 5 PM & 9:15 AM services)
Announcements
Message – “Obedience: Confrontation” [Joe Hishmeh]
“Always” (Bb) [Kristian Stanfill, Jason Ingram]
“Hosanna” (Eb) [Brooke Ligertwood]
“This Is Amazing Grace” (Bb) [Phil Wickham, Josh Farro, Jeremy Riddle]
Dismissal

Thoughts: This was a powerful weekend. Once again, Joe’s message was a powerful challenge to follow Christ with all of our lives, and to confront the evil in our world and lives with the power of the gospel. We started out our weekend in the pre-service time with Dustin Kensrue’s “Suffering Servant,” which is a fantastic song from his new record, coming almost directly from Isaiah 52 & 53. This song has brought me to tears several times over the past month, as I have been overwhelmed with the amazing sacrifice that Jesus made for our redemption. It is powerful in both its words and in its music. There are quite a few words to the song, so it may remain a song for special occasions, but I would love to sing it more often. We continued into the service with Becky leading us in “Sing to the King,” which gives us great words by which to celebrate Christ’s victory, and which is one of our church’s favorites. In response to the message, we expressed our confidence and trust in the Lord through singing “Always.” We hadn’t sung this song in quite a while, and it was great to sing it again, as it is a powerful statement of our faith. From there, Becky led us in singing “Hosanna,” and then we closed out the service with “This Is Amazing Grace.” This song has been one of my favorites lately, mainly for the chorus: “This is amazing grace/ This is unfailing love/ That You would take my place/ That You would bear my cross/ You would lay down Your life/ That I would be set free/ Jesus, I sing for/ All that You’ve done for me!”

THAT is why we sing. THAT is why we worship. Jesus has been so good to us.

Your turn: what were your experiences, observations, or take-aways from these past two weekends?

– Bill

This weekend we continued in the fourth week of our series, “Obedience,” and Joe shared about David’s life, leadership, and heart for God from 2 Samuel. You can listen to or watch the entire message and service here.

Here’s our service plan:

“Made Alive” (C) [Brian Eichelberger, Zach Bolen]
“Glorious One” (C) [Steve Fee]
Greeting Time
Announcements
Message – “Obedience: Devotion” [Joe Hishmeh]
“Forever Reign” (Ab) [Jason Ingram, Reuben Morgan]
“You Are God Alone” (Ab) [Billy Foote, Cindy Foote]
“Lord of All” (A) [Kristian Stanfill]
Dismissal

Thoughts: This was another great weekend of services. Joe’s message was challenging for all of us, as he called us to be faithful and responsive to God throughout our lives, and to leave behind the emptiness that so often comes from living by our own will. Our team did a great job throughout the weekend. We began our services by celebrating Jesus and His finished work for us as we sang “Made Alive” and “Glorious One,” which is one of my longtime favorites that we haven’t sung much here at Fellowship since I’ve been here. It was great to sing it together this week. Sarah Oldberg led us powerfully on “Forever Reign” and “You Are God Alone,” and the church engaged well as we responded to Joe’s message with these songs. We closed out our weekend with a powerful declaration of God’s sovereignty and surpassing worth in “Lord of All.” I wanted this to be a moment where we could intentionally set our eyes on Jesus as Lord of all, and commit our way to respond to Him and His leading throughout our days. I love this song, and still maintain that it’s a song that the Church (big “C”) needs to sing, because it carries a truth that resonates powerfully in the heart of every believer: “There is none so high and holy/ King of kings, the One and only!”

Your turn: what were your experiences, observations, or take-aways from these past two weekends?

– Bill

This weekend we continued our series, “Obedience,” and Joe shared about how we are called to follow Jesus in all situations. Whether we are experiencing crisis or success, we are to follow His leadership and submit to Him, rather than seeking out our own means for trying to save ourselves. Only Jesus can deliver us. You can listen to or watch the entire message and service here.

Here’s our service plan:

Pre-Service – “Kingdom” (A) [Kristian Stanfill]
“Before The Throne” (A) [Charitie Lees Bancroft, arr. by The Modern Post]
Greeting Time
Announcements
Message – “Obedience: Calling” [Joe Hishmeh]
Communion Song – “Carried To The Table” (A) [Leeland Mooring, Marc Byrd, Steve Hindalong]
“One Thing Remains” (Bb) [Christa Black, Brian Johnson, Jeremy Riddle]
“You Never Let Go” (Bb) [Matt Redman, Beth Redman]
Dismissal

Thoughts: This was a great weekend together. Our team did a fantastic job. Trent Raines co-led with me this weekend, and he led powerfully during our communion time with “Carried to the Table,” which is a perfect communion song. Also, one my guitar students, Brynn Baker, played lead guitar for the first time as part of our weekend service team, and she knocked it out of the park. She continues to step up and do a great job wherever she is serving (at 13 years of age!!! I had just picked up guitar at 13 years old, and she would play circles around an 18-year-old version of me…). Her playing was definitely a bright spot for me this weekend, especially when she nailed the lead part on “Kingdom,” which is one of my favorites. “Before The Throne” continues to be a song that really resonates with our congregation. I prefaced our singing of it by reminding us that even our worship is acceptable to God only because of Jesus’ finished work for us, and not because of anything we have done or can do. Jesus is everything for us! We finished our time together with two songs that called us to trust in Jesus and His faithfulness: “One Thing Remains,” and “You Never Let G0.” These two songs are simple declarations and powerful reminders for the Church to sing together, and it was a fitting way to respond to Joe’s message this week.

At some point in the near future, I hope to take some time to write about my recent trip to the Philippines with the Trash Mountain Project. It was both challenging and inspiring, and I’m still processing much of what I saw and experienced. The Lord is doing great things there, and He is raising up some amazing leaders to advance the gospel in some of the darkest parts of the world. Please pray for them as they fight the good fight!

Your turn: what were your experiences, observations, or take-aways from these past two weekends?

– Bill

This weekend was the first of our new series, “Obedience.” In this message,  Joe shared about how being on mission with God requires us to be in submission to the Word of God. He called us to “scrap everything” for the daily practice of filling our minds with the Word of God and following God in love. You can listen to or watch the entire message and service here.

Here’s our service plan:

Welcome
“Rejoice” (Bb) [Dustin Kensrue, Stuart Townend]
“Everlasting God” (Bb) [Brenton Brown, Ken Riley]
Greeting Time
Announcements
Message – “Obedience: Mission” [Joe Hishmeh]
“You Are God Alone (Not a god)” (A) [Billy Foote, Cindy Foote]
“Glory to God Forever” (A) [Steve Fee, Vicky Beeching]
“Hosanna” (E) [Brooke Ligertwood]
Dismissal

Thoughts: This was a fantastic weekend with our church. Joe’s message was a great challenge to follow Jesus more closely, and our church engaged well with both the preaching and the singing. Our team did a great job. We opened with “Rejoice,” celebrating the faithful love, compassion, and mercy of God. We continued with “Everlasting God,” where we acknowledged that our strength to follow comes from the Lord, whose strength and love for us never fails. We responded to the message with Kelsey leading “You Are God Alone (Not a god),” which we sang to focus on the sovereignty and trustworthiness of God. I pointed to this sovereignty and constancy as the reason we can trust the Lord in obedience, knowing that His way is best for us. We continued on with “Glory to God Forever,” where we moved from seeing God’s sovereignty to responding with the offering of our lives for His glory because of His surpassing worth. Finally, we closed with Brooke Ligertwood’s “Hosanna,” which calls us as God’s people to follow Him closely in light of His return and in light of eternity. It was a great weekend, where everything tied together well the team led well.

On another note, this weekend marked my third year here at Fellowship, and it has served as a time of reflecting on all the Lord has done during my time here. I am overwhelmed at the goodness of God and His blessings in my life. He has done great things! 

Next weekend, I will be in the Philippines with the Trash Mountain Project to help equip some local pastors and to minister in several trash dump communities. I may post some notes about the trip when I get back, so be on the lookout. Please pray for us as we seek to build up the Body of Christ there!

Your turn: what were your experiences, observations, or take-aways from these past two weekends?

– Bill

This weekend was the third and final week of our series, “The Story.” In his message,  Joe shared about how and why we to share the gospel in a compelling manner, inviting others to trust in Jesus for their salvation. You can listen to or watch the entire message and service here.

Here’s our service plan:

Pre-Service – “True Love” (C) [Phil Wickham]
Welcome
“Hosanna (Praise Is Rising)” (G) [Paul Baloche, Brenton Brown]
Greeting Time
Announcements
Message – “The Story: Share It Compellingly” [Joe Hishmeh]
“Your Great Name” (Bb) [Michael Neale, Krissy Nordhoff]
“Lead Me To The Cross” (Bm) [Brooke Ligertwood]
“I Will Go” (F#m) [Tim Neufeld, Jon Neufeld, Allen Salmon]
Dismissal

Thoughts: I believe this weekend was a great weekend for our church. Joe really called us all into sharing the gospel with the people in our lives, because Jesus is worth it. Our singing echoed that same thought, and it was a great call and challenge to each of us as we evaluated our priorities.

We began in the pre-service time the same as we had the previous two weeks, with “True Love” by Phil Wickham. I love this song, because it is a very powerful portrait of the gospel and what Jesus accomplished for us. We then began the service by inviting the Lord to have His way in us as we sang “Hosanna (Praise Is Rising),” which is an excellent call to worship. Later, we responded to Joe’s message with “Your Great Name,” reflecting on the power of the name of Jesus. Jesus changes everything. His name, and His name alone, has the power to save. We continued with “Lead Me To The Cross” to give us words through which to express our submission to the Lord’s call to take up our cross and follow Him in proclaiming the good news. We closed our service with another song in that same vein, “I Will Go,” which is a little bit of a punch in the gut, if we’re honest. It calls us from our comfort and privilege to sacrifice, service, and submission in reaching the lost and needy in our world. Everyone who encounters Jesus has to wrestle with that decision–either they leave following Him more closely, or they walk away further from Him and more committed to being “lord” of their own lives. I called the church to see the surpassing worth of Jesus and what He has done for us, and to respond with living our lives in worship and submission to Him. He alone is worthy!

Your turn: what were your experiences, observations, or take-aways from these past two weekends?

– Bill

This weekend was the second of our series called, “The Story.” This week, pastor Joe shared about how we all need to be live out the gospel so that we can be confident in it as we share with others. You can listen to or watch the entire message and service here.

Here’s our service plan:

Pre-Service – “True Love” (C) [Phil Wickham]
Welcome
“Happy Day” (B) [Tim Hughes, Ben Cantelon]
Greeting Time
Announcements
Message – “The Story: Live The Story” [Joe Hishmeh]
“Jesus Take All Of Me (Just As I Am)” (C) [Charlotte Elliot, Brenton Brown]
“Because of Your Love” (G) [Phil Wickham]
“Jesus Paid It All” (C) [John T. Grape, Elvina M. Hall, add. chorus by Alex Nifong]
Dismissal

Thoughts: This weekend was another great weekend. Again, reflecting on the power of the gospel is the greatest motive we have to worship Jesus. He loves us and He gave Himself up for our redemption. He is so worthy of worship!

Your turn: what were your experiences, observations, or take-aways from these past two weekends?

– Bill

This weekend was the first in our series called, “The Story.” Our pastor Joe shared about how we all need to be clear about the message of the gospel so that we can share it with others. You can listen to or watch the entire message and service here.

Here’s our service plan:

Pre-Service – “True Love” (C) [Phil Wickham]
Welcome
“In Tenderness” (G) [Nate Garvey, Adoniram Judson Gordon, W. Spencer Walton]
“Before The Throne Of God Above” (A) [Charitie Lees Bancroft]
Greeting Time
Announcements
Message – “The Story: Know The Story” [Joe Hishmeh]
“You Alone Can Rescue” (Bb) [Matt Redman, Jonas Myrin]
“This Is Amazing Grace” (Bb) [Josh Farro, Jeremy Riddle, Phil Wickham]
“Made Alive” (G) [Zach Bolen, Brian Eichelberger]
Dismissal

Thoughts: This weekend was incredible. It is probably stating the obvious, but I absolutely love singing about the gospel and the finished work of Jesus for us. This series is all about that, and this weekend was one where we could sing a bunch of our favorite songs together. It was a powerful service, and I was moved by the amazing grace and love of Jesus for us. He has done great things! It was an awesome way to end 2013 together.

Your turn: what were your experiences, observations, or take-aways from these past two weekends?

– Bill

Here are the song sets from all of our Advent services this year. It is always one of my favorite seasons of the year, as we celebrate how God is with us, and also anticipate how He is coming again for us! You can watch the messages and services here.

December 7 & 8, 2013

“Joy to the World” (G) [George Friedrich Handel, Isaac Watts, arr. by Bill Horn] 
“Lead Me To The Cross” (Bm) [Brooke Ligertwood]
“What Child Is This” (Em) [William Chatterton Dix, arr. by Bill Horn]
“O Come Let Us Adore Him” (D) [Matt Crocker, Autumn Hardman, C. Frederick Oakeley, Ryan Taubert, John Francis Wade]

December 14 & 15, 2013

“Hark The Herald Angels Sing” (E) [Felix Mendelssohn, Charles Wesley, arr. by Bill Horn]
“Hosanna” (E) [Brooke Ligertwood]
“Your Great Name” (Bb) [Micheal Neale, Krissy Nordhoff]
“Jesus Messiah” (G) [Daniel Carson, Jesse Reeves, Ed Cash, Chris Tomlin]
“O Holy Night” (C) [Adolphe Charles Adam, Placide Cappeau, John S. Dwight]

December 21 & 22, 2013

“Angels From The Realms Of Glory” (Bb) [James Montgomery, Henry Thomas Smart, arr. by Bill Horn]
“Everlasting God” (Bb) [Brenton Brown, Ken Riley]
“O Come, O Come, Emmanuel” (Em) [Henry Sloane Coffin, Thomas Helmore, John Mason Neale]
“You Have Overcome” (A) [Bill Horn, Erik Oldberg]
“Rejoice” (Bb) [Dustin Kensrue, Stuart Townend]

Christmas Eve, December 24, 2013

“Joy To The World” (C) [George Friedrich Handel, Isaac Watts, arr. by Bill Horn]
“Go Tell It On The Mountain” (D) [John W. Work]
“O Come Let Us Adore Him” (D) [Matt Crocker, Autumn Hardman, C. Frederick Oakeley, Ryan Taubert, John Francis Wade]
“What Child Is This” (Em) [William Chatterton Dix, arr. by Bill Horn]
“Silent Night” (G) [Franz Xaver Gruber, Joseph Mohr, John Freeman Young]

What is “Blended Worship”?

Blended worship is essentially a blending of the two major ways of thinking about worship: aesthetic and kinesthetic. Aesthetic worship emphasizes beauty and order, while kinesthetic worship emphasizes the experience and participation of the worshiper. When these are blended, it can take many forms, yet these foundations remain the same. In this presentation, we will examine some of the foundations and motivations of blended worship designs, along with challenges and examples of these designs.

An Overview of Worship Renewals of the 21st Century

Blended worship is linked to the major events of both the liturgical and contemporary worship renewal movements in the 21st century (Exploring the Worship Spectrum, pg. 175).

The Renewal of Liturgical Worship
  • In the 21st century liturgical worship can be characterized as:
    • Tied into a print form of communication
    • Service structure is predictable and executed based on a pattern.
    • Worship is isolationist in nature.
  • These three principles drove the worship structure until the 1960’s during Vatican II and the Roman Catholic reforms. Reforms that came from this include:
    • Worship is put into the language of the people and simplified.
    • Focused on the renewal of theology, architecture, style, and environment.
  • These reforms took root in the Protestant denomination in 6 different ways:
    • There is new concern to restore the theology of worship.
    • There is new attention to the historic pattern of worship.
    • The Lord’s Supper of reexamined.
    • The Christian year is restored.
    • New discussion and questions about the role of music and the arts of worship appear.
    • The desire to include the entirety of the congregation in the worship experience.
The Renewal of Contemporary Worship
  • Three movements lead into the renewal of contemporary worship:
    • Azusa Street and the Pentecostal Movement beginning in 1906.
    • Latter Rain Movement, known of it’s spontaneous worship.
    • The rise of the chorus tradition which lead to the more current rock band style popularized by the Vineyard movement.
The Blending of Worship

“Blended worship brought the content of the liturgical movement and the experience of the contemporary movement together.” (Exploring the Worship Spectrum, pp. 177-178)

This blending began in 1987, where national worship was led by Maranatha! to explore what the blending of these two worship forms could bring.

“Blended worship at its best is substance and relevance, truth and experience, divine and human.” (Exploring the Worship Spectrum, p. 179)

Blended worship is a combination of the strengths of the other forms of worship. (Exploring The Worship Spectrum, p. 176)

• Liturgical tradition—emphasis on beauty
• Reformed tradition—emphasis on the centrality of the Word
• Anabaptist tradition—concern for community and discipleship within worship
• Restorationist tradition—commitment to weekly Communion
• Revivalist tradition (Baptists, Methodists, evangelicals)—concern to move toward the invitation and call sinners to repentance
• Holiness tradition—emphasis on the need to break through and achieve sanctification in worship
• African-American tradition—emphasis on soul worship


Motivations of Blended Worship

Blended worship ultimately comes from a heart to unite the Church, rather than to segment it because of preferences in worship. In joining elements of both the aesthetic and the kinesthetic together into one worship service, generations can be drawn together. Also, the best of each worship tradition can be valued and shared with the other. Those of the traditional or aesthetic tradition have the opportunity to learn from and value the fervency and passion of the kinesthetic tradition. Those of the contemporary or kinesthetic tradition have the opportunity to learn from and value the love of truth and beauty of the aesthetic tradition. Multiple generations can learn from one another, and legacy can be shared in this context, which would not be possible if the different generations and traditions were segregated from one another based on their respective preferences.


Difficulties of Blended Worship

Blended worship can easily fall into the trap of seeking to please everyone, rather than leading a congregation toward a God-given vision for the church. A worship leader considering blended worship must be careful to not simply use it because it is the best “compromise,” but rather because it follows the leading it makes the most sense in the current worship environment for their particular congregation.

Blended worship is not meant to be a “catering” to needs or wants, but rather a leading the church into unity and leading one generation toward the other. The target is not the pleasure of the congregation (making everyone happy) but on unity. If blended worship devolves into a means to please people, then it misses the mark, and settles for far less than it can be. This is a common issue in blended worship environments. In order for blended worship to work, everyone in the congregation will have to make some sort of sacrifice and give something up, in order to serve one another.

Another difficulty of blended worship is in forming a team that can confidently and skillfully lead a congregation in multiple styles of music from multiple generations. The music of one generation or another can easily be done poorly, and the people can smell a fake. It then seems disengenuous, and it disengages the congregation, rather than engaging them together. Care must be given to the presentation of the various styles within a service, to ensure that each is an authentic and skillful representation of the media.

  • Achieving cohesiveness with varying styles
  • Many congregants remain unsatisfied with the mixed style offering
  • Invites criticism of the unpreferred style
  • Presenting multiple styles with one, unified team
  • Team talent limitations
  • Sacrifice of team members to play other styles which are less desirable to them
  • Some songs/styles are more difficult to lead than others
  • Requires adaptability and flexibility on team


Examples of Blended Worship

The description “blended worship” covers a broad sweep of churches and worship services, which can range from mostly traditional to mostly contemporary, while including aspects of both. The flow of blended worship environments also depends on the tradition from which they are born. Some spring out of very liturgical, aesthetic tradition, while others spring from more of a revivalist tradition, all of which influences the look and feel of how they design and lead a blended worship offering. Below are some examples of blended worship.

General Blended Worship Outline from Exploring The Worship Spectrum

– Preservice music
– First set of music
– Prayer/Welcome
– Second set of music
– Sermon
– Invitation
– Offering
– Decisions affirmed by church
– Benediction

Another example from the text

– Gathering Songs
– Entrance Hymn with Procession (The experience of coming before God)
– Greeting, Call to Worship, and Invocation
– Songs of Praise and Worship (The experience of God’s transcendence)
– Confession and Forgiveness (The experience of God’s forgiveness and relationship)
– Opening Prayer (Transition to the Word)

Other Examples of Blended Worship Service Designs
Design by Brandon Cullum

Prelude – Great is Thy Faithfulness
Special Music – The Heart of Worship
Welcome and Greeting – led by Pastor
Worship through Music
– From the Inside Out
– How Great is our God
– Great is Thy Faithfulness
Scripture Reading  – Psalms 48:10 – led by Elder
Offertory – instrumental
Worship through Music –  Awesome is the Lord Most High
Sermon – Pastor
Invitation – Turn Your Eyes Upon Jesus
Benediction – led by Pastor

Design by Bill Horn 

Pre-service – Video Countdown
Call to Worship – Ps. 96:1-4
Worship Through Singing
– Sing to the King
– On Christ The Solid Rock I Stand
Prayer/Welcome/ Time of Greeting – Lead Pastor
Worship Through Singing
– You Never Let Go
– It Is Well
Worship Through the Word – James 1 – “Faithful” – Lead Pastor
Response – ‘Tis So Sweet to Trust in Jesus
Worship Through Giving – In Christ Alone
Benediction – Lead Pastor

Design by Adam Gillespie

Pre-Service Music – The Family of God (Instrumental)
Welcome / Prayer – Deacon of the Week
Expressions of Praise – Music Minister
– We are God’s People (Hymn 383)
– Oh, How I Love Jesus
– Blessed Assurance, Jesus Is Mine (Hymn 334)
Special Music / Testimony – Praise Band
– Amazing Grace (My Chains Are Gone)
Proclamation of God’s Word – Eph. 1:7-10 – “How Great Is Our God!” – Lead Pastor
Invitation to Respond – Just a Closer Walk With Thee
Worship Through Giving – Take My Life
Presentation of Decisions and Closing Prayer
Closing Song – The Family of God (instrumental)

Resources and References for learning more about Blended Worship

Referenced in this presentation:

Exploring the Worship Spectrum. Paul A. Basden, ed.  Zondervan: Grand Rapids, 2004.

Other Resources:

Books

Holy Gatherings by Michael Sharp and Argile Smith

Unceasing Worship, by Harold M. Best

Christ-Centered Worship by Bryan Chapell

Engaging With God by David Peterson

Worship Matters by Bob Kauflin

Worship By The Book, edited by D.A. Carson

Planning Blended Worship: The Creative Mixture of Old and New by Robert Webber

Articles

Gary Hollingsworth – Moving from traditional to blended worship
In this article Gary outlines 10 steps when making the transition from traditional to blended:

  1. Take Your Time
  2. Do Your Homework
  3. Know Where You are Headed
  4. Work to Earn Trust
  5. Expect Challenge
  6. Transition Is a Prcoess, Not an Event
  7. Call the Right Personnel
  8. Don’t Compromise Quality
  9. Understand Techincal issues
  10. Be Prayerful and Careful

David Burroughs – The Brouhaha About Blended Worship
In this article from beliefnet.com gives a great overview of the current trends, benefits and concerns over blended worship.  There is a great emphasis on unity between the older and younger generation and how Blended worship seek to bridge the gap that exists between generations as well as between typical service times.

Presentation created by Bill Horn, Brandon Cullum, and Adam Gillespie for Dr. Gregory Woodward and Dr. Gary Dennis, for the course Worship Leadership of New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary 

As followers of Jesus, we are to remember and pass on the Word of God to the people in our lives. This was what our lead pastor, Joe Hishmeh, shared as we concluded our series titled “Faith.” You can listen to or watch the entire messages and services here.

Here’s our service plan:

Welcome
“Happy Day” (B) [Tim Hughes, Ben Cantelon]
Greeting Time
Child Dedications
Announcements
Message – “Faith: Instructed” [Joe Hishmeh]
“10,000 Reasons (Bless The Lord)” (G) [Matt Redman, Jonas Myrin]
“Son of God” (G) [Tim Neufeld, Jon Neufeld, Ed Cash, Gordon Cochran]
“In Tenderness” (G) [Nate Garvey, Adoniram Judson Gordon, W. Spencer Walton]
Dismissal

Thoughts: This weekend was fun. Our team led well, and all the pieces connected well. Trent Raines did a great job co-leading. The weekend before Thanksgiving always seems to be a special one, as people are more mindful of their many blessings and reasons to worship the Lord.

The highlights for me were “In Tenderness” and “Son of God.” The church sang well throughout the weekend, but it reached its peak when we sang those two songs. I absolutely love the declarations of those songs, and it’s moving for me when I hear the congregation singing it out together. It was a great weekend.

One of the things I am most thankful for in my life is the congregation I get to serve each week. They are amazing people!

So, I leave you with this: what were your experiences, observations, or take-aways from these past two weekends?

– Bill